Would You Move Back To Laos?

This thoughts about moving back and live in Laos has been bouncing in my head for few days.  Not that I’ll be making a move myself, not now at least.  The reason I had this thought because one of my cousin and his wife is making that journey soon.  They both retired young and been ponder over the big moves to Laos.  Sold all their belongings, rent out the house and off they go next week.  I talked to them yesterday, they both seems to be happy and looking forward to be back in the motherland.  It is a scary moves.  I guess the worse comes to worse they can always come back.  Would anyone of you make the move if opportunity is there??

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26 thoughts on “Would You Move Back To Laos?

  1. Dallas

    What type of visa are they using for this adventure? or they will be denouncing their American citizenship?
    I don’t think I can do this. The bond that I have with my family is too strong. I would miss my parent, brothers/sisters and my kids would miss their cousins and grandparents. Mrs Dallas would feel the same too. The grandparents love the kids. I can’t do that to them.
    My kids have far better opportunity to make something of themselves here in USA than they would have in Laos.
    If I have money and the time I would visit Lao every year. But I wouldn’t want to live there.

    Reply
    1. seeharhed Post author

      Dallas, I am not so sure what type of visa they will be acquiring on this trip. I’m pretty positive that they will keep their US citizenship, due to the fact that they still have properties in the states. I remember reading something at Vientaine Times earlier this year, the Laos Government is making it easy for people that wants to stay in Laos longer. My cousins been going back and forth for many years plus they just finished building the house. I guess I’ll have another free place to stay:-) and a car to drive too..

      I’m with you Dallas, as of right now I dont think I can move back just yet. Although, when I retired I want a little house in Luangprabang where Nam Kharn and MeKong Rive meets.

      Reply
  2. Nye

    Probably not, one main concern for me is the health care situation, it could be very costly, and if you don’t have the money then it’s a tragic to watch your loved ones die and can’t do a thing to help. My Aunt has to have dialysis now and has to go to Thailand to get it done and very expensive also, if I were living in Laos I wouldn’t be able to help at all. If you decide to move there, you better hope and pray that you’ve a good health.

    Reply
  3. lady0fdarkness

    No. There are two reason’s why. Though I am proud to be Lao, I have established myself as an American and have lived as an American for pretty much my entire life. I will continue to live the American dream, but will still embrace my culture as a Lao woman.

    The second reason is because Laos has turned into a Communist country. The people of Laos may not be Communist, but their government is. The Communist movement into Laos caused my father and so many loved ones to die; I don’t want to live where the heartaches of life began.

    Reply
  4. seeharhed Post author

    Nye, your absolutely right about the health care situation. Most people cross the river to Thailand to seek any type of medical helps. It is also very expensive and everything is paying in cash.

    ladyofdarkness, I think most lao-american feels the same way you do. It is probably better to just visit, brings in the $$ to boost the local economy and come back home.

    Reply
    1. seeharhed Post author

      David, thanks for stopping by. Yes, you’re right! Laos is growing fast and constantly building to meet the demand of tourism.

      As of right now, I can’t see myself living in Laos just yet. First of all, I’m not even close to retired from work yet. Although, it is dream that someday I will be able to go back and live in the motherland. Whether, it is full time or part time.

      I just talked to my cousins this morning and they are ready to go.

      Reply
  5. Cambree

    Moving abroad would be a big decision for anyone, especially if you have children.

    But whether you are from Laos or some other country, it’s good to at least visit your homeland once in your lifetime.

    I wish your cousins much success with their move.

    Reply
    1. seeharhed Post author

      By now, they should already landed in Laos. I haven’t hear anything from them yet, but I’m sure I will pretty soon. Most likely they will be emailing me and update their situation.

      They have 2 kids, both are in their late 20’s and very independent kids. But, I’m sure they will be coming and going often.

      Reply
  6. eerenoon

    If I have the opportunity, I would rather leave everything behind and go… Like my uncle, resigned from his accountant post, sold his house, car etc and left for Australia. And now he is a wine maker… I admire him a lot… If the opportunity is there, just grab it…

    Reply
    1. seeharhed Post author

      eerenoon, sounds like you’re uncle is doing well in Laos. Does he have his own label? On my last trip, I got a chance to taste some wine from various makers in Laos. I bought a bottle of red wine made from the plum, it was okay.

      I am worry for my cousins but I’m sure they will be okay. The worse comes to worse, they can always move back to U.S.

      Reply
  7. salalao

    Absolutely in a heart beat. If the lao government change the law by having two citizenship, able to buy and own property in Laos, and be able to work legally. Oh boy would that be great, there is so much things you can do. If Laos government want to be re-built their broken land they should think about the people who lived and study abroad can help out not just dependent on NGO.

    Reply
    1. seeharhed Post author

      salalao, very well said… I think most of lao folks living aboard have similar feelings toward Laos. No set laws to protect you and your investments. You’re risking a lot, but if you’re risk taker then this is the best time to head back.

      Last week I talked to a friend from Laos, she told me that so many Lao/American are buying properties along the rivers.

      Reply
      1. salalao

        Nye
        I put my property in my aunt name. She has the deed on my house and land. My mother family is very large clans and they swore to me that they will never never sale it or move in. It’s been three years now I visit Laos yearly and the house and the car is in perfect shape. It’ s becuase they don’t have the keys to my place this made it safes. They do take care of the out side property for me that is; with the labor. In Laos nothing is free even with your relatives. They expected alot from us. This is the set back for me because when each time I go home, there are always a relative that asking for money. They think when you live in U.S we can grow money on trees.

      2. Nye

        salalao, I kind of thought that you can’t have it in your name, same as in Thailand, this is to prevent giving ownership to non citizens. I think if I’ve a house in Laos, I wouldn’t mind to have a trusted relative to live there and help care for it, maybe one that don’t have a family or large family.

    2. Nye

      Salalao, I believe that education might not be the first priority for the government and country because education means new and better ideas, and that means changes, not what they’re looking for at all. I think we all know the political state that we’re in, and those in power wouldn’t want any changes. Are you willing to be stripped of all the freedom that you’ve now. For some, the transition might be simple because they just want a simple life, but for others, it’s frustrating, and impossible to live there because of a different ideology, not two people are a like.

      Reply
      1. salalao

        I totally agree with you with the FREEDOM. That why we end up here. I was hoping they would relax the rules because they are part of ASEAN. Becuase they need to improve their economically they need to have good education system and medically too if they plan to build resorts or casino. They need to reassurance the tourists that if they are sick or need the medical attention. They get the best care. As previously mention your aunt have to go to Thailand for treatment. Now that is a shame we have Laos Phyicians, nurses, teachers, so on all types of professionals would willing to go back and do something good for their country but no they depends so much on NGO, temporary service.
        It ‘s a joke, don’t get me start with Laos goverment, they’re bunch of idiots.

  8. Victor

    Seeharhed – very interesting question and reading all the comments. It is a hard decision, isn’t it? Esp if one has a family and attachment in the country they live in now, such as America.

    I think Laos is a very beautiful country with so much opportunity and potential for Lao that are living overseas that can contribute and help the country and the people to become more prosperous in many ways; such as standard of living, jobs, educations – and lifting the country out of poverty.

    For me, I have lived in America for 7 yrs and now in Australia for 16 yrs. As I grow older, I begin to think about where I came from, my own roots. I will never forget that. My dream is to spend the remaining of life between Penang, Asia and Australia. Eventhough I have lived in Australia almost half of my life now, it is not quite the same as my hometown where I was born and grew up.

    I guess it is very different compare to places like Laos, Vietnam, Cambodia where there was a long history of heartache and hard ship. And, more difficult for overseas Lao to pack up and leave the American dreams.

    But, if you do buy a place in LP, I will visit you there.

    Reply
    1. seeharhed Post author

      Victor – it is a tough decision one has to make. I am getting the most comments out of this topic. It will be a tough adjustment for me, not the living condition. I am used to living with minimal necessities and I’ll be okay in Laos. The tough part would be speaking out and careful what not to say. I have similar dream like yours, I want to spend the last part of my life in the motherland. Although I haven’t lived in as many places like yourself.

      That would be a dream comes true for me.. a little hut near the MeKong and Nam Karn Rivers. You more than welcome to visit me and I’ll probably prepare you some disco shrimps.. hahahhaah

      Reply
      1. Victor

        LOL! You are on – disco shrimp! I’ve got to try it even if it takes me 10 mins to hold the spoon, stare at the live shrimps before shafting into my mouth. Still cannot imagine what it feels like to have them jumping and bouncing inside my mouth.

  9. Nye

    I didn’t know this when I went to Laos, after I came back one of my sister was looking for a life insurance because her work place doesn’t offered anymore and I took her to North Carolina Farm Bureau (one of the local companies here) and the guy asked her if she plan to visit Laos because they don’t support people visiting a communist country. Kind of surprised to hear this, and I guess they won’t pay if anything were to happen to you over there.

    The guy kept talking about death of this and that, and she ended up not buying it at all. I guess he didn’t know our culture very well that it’s a jink to talk about death, especially to your potential client.

    Reply
    1. seeharhed Post author

      Nye, this is new to me and I’m even surprise that guy even know where Laos is at. Also knowing the political status of Laos. I wonder if someone was a policy holder of NCFB insurance is laotian and died in Laos. That’s why NCFB doesn’t offered to anyone that plan to visit Laos.

      Reply
      1. Nye

        They do offer the policy, but will not pay if you died in Laos. Just like suicide, they would only pay if you’d the policy more than 2 years.

  10. Ken

    As good as everything sounds in Laos, just so you know, the Laos government (err Viet) are still not as forgiving as you might think. For example, you have no chance of regaining Lao citizenship if you’re an expat while the Vietnamese or other nationales are granted citizenship without discretion. Also, believe it of not, a lot of land are own by Koreans or others nationals according a govt. land surveyor I talk last time I was there.
    So, to live in Lao permanently – NO. But it certainly is in my plan to visit as much as possible.

    Reply
    1. seeharhed Post author

      Ken – Thanks for stopping by and the comments. It is on going battle between lao citizens and government. Guess who’s winning that battle?? The government continue to lure all those SE Asia countries by giving them land to build factories. I’m not sure how much those translate to jobs for lao citizens.

      Reply

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